Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

*WARNING: THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS*

I’m going to start with a quick plot summary, because before I read this I didn’t really know what Anna Karenina was actually about. So, in brief: Oblonsky has cheated on his wife Dolly but he convinces his sister Anna to talk to her and they don’t get divorced; meanwhile Oblonsky’s friend Levin is in love with Dolly’s sister Kitty but she wants to marry Vronsky who is in love with Anna who is already married to Karenin but goes ahead and has an affair with Vronsky anyway so he rejects Kitty but it’s okay because she marries Levin anyway and Levin has these two brothers and one is a drug addict and the other is a stuffy author and they don’t do much but they’re around a lot and then Anna leaves her husband but he won’t give her a divorce and won’t let her keep their son so she’s very depressed about that and Dolly is the only one who will talk to her even though Oblonsky also works hard to convince Karenin to divorce Anna.

Everyone got that? It really could not be simpler.

Okay, on to the review part: I’m giving this book three stars because it seemed like the fairest rating, considering that some parts of this book deserved a five-star rating and some parts deserved one star. Everything with Anna and Vronsky was really interesting and amazing – I loved Anna so much, and I really wanted to be friends with her. She was lovely. Unfortunately, she and her lovah had to compete with Kitty and Levin, the other important couple of the story. And good god are they boring. Levin owns a farm, which means we get chapters upon chapters of nothing but him babbling on about farming techniques and how nobody does the job right and what he wants to do to improve his farm.

Also, the book should have ended right after Anna killed herself, or at least ended by talking about how Vronsky was dealing with it. But that doesn’t happen. In the last thirty-some pages of the book, Anna throws herself under a train, and for the rest of the book we get a little mention of how Vronsky has volunteered to fight in some war, but the rest of it is all about Levin and his farm and local politics and his spiritual crisis and OH MY GOD I DON’T CARE. Once I had read two chapters about Levin after Anna’s death, I flipped through the rest of the book, saw that he was the sole focus of the rest of the story, and almost stopped reading. I could have, too, and I wouldn’t have missed anything important.

Verdict: three out of five stars

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